Thursday, 26 July 2012

Domenica Pate Career Interview

Domenica Pate Career Interview - We caught up with Domenica Pate to ask her about her career in Archaeology so far...

1. Where did you graduate and what are you doing now?I graduated last summer from University of Calabria in History of Art, although my studies were mainly focused on archaeology. I’m currently attending a postgraduate two years school, specializing in Medieval Archaeology at University of Salento, in Lecce.
2. When you graduated were you looking for a career in archaeology?Absolutely. Becoming an archaeologist is what I wanted to do since I was twelve or thirteen and over the years the dream became a project. That’s why after my graduation I’ve decided to try and apply for my specialization. I’m not sure my “career” in archaeology has begun yet, but I like to think this was the first step into it.
3. How has a degree in archaeology benefited your career?My studies certainly helped me getting into this postgraduate school, but unfortunately when it came to my job history they didn’t matter. Up till now all my jobs had nothing or very little to do with archaeology, which is still, at least in Italy, a very tough field. It’s no mystery that in my country many archaeologists quit their career a few years after they complete their studies due to either lack of jobs/positions as researchers or working conditions that make earning a living very difficult. Sometimes you even see very competent people leaving the field after many years of sacrifices and good work.
4. What has been the greatest success in your career so far?I’m not really sure I can answer this question, since I feel like my career in archaeology hasn’t started yet. As far as my personal history goes, anyway, I believe every short term employment I had was somehow a success, each of them allowing me to learn something new or strengthen my previous knowledge and make a living out of it, which with the current economic crisis is something to be thankful for. Anyhow, as many others do, I believe in times like these lies the opportunity to be creative and to build something, and that’s what I hope for the future, whether my career will continue as an archaeologist or I’ll end up choosing a different path.

Wednesday, 25 July 2012

Italian Archaeologists Believe They Found Skeleton Of The Real Mona Lisa

Italian Archaeologists Believe They Found Skeleton Of The Real Mona Lisa     

According to the Huffington Post, Much attention has been paid to Mona Lisa's smile throughout the years, but this week her skeleton is winding up in the spotlight. Italian archaeologists announced Tuesday they found the skeleton of Lisa Gherardini, believed to be the model for Leonardo's masterpiece, which currently hangs in The Louvre in Paris. Found near the convent of Sant'Orsola in Florence, the bones will be sent to the Department for the Conservation of Cultural Property for an examination.    

Read more here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/18/italian-archaeologists-be_n_1682833.html

Mexican archaeologists discover three 1,000 year old tombs near Monte Albán in Oaxaca

According to Art Daily, Mexican archaeologists discover three 1,000 year old tombs near Monte Albán in Oaxaca

ATZOMPA, OAXACA.- A funerary complex more than 1,100 years old and composed of three funerary chambers was discovered in the prehistoric site of Aztompa, Oaxaca. This discovery is highly important since it was registered inside a building that was designed exclusively to harbor a series of tombs which are placed vertically, one on top of another, and the main difference between the prior and the recently discovered tombs is that they weren’t found underground.
Read more info here: http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=56687

Archaeological Digs in Kegworth and Castle Donington - August

Archaeological Digs in Kegworth and Castle Donington - August

This summer you can learn the basic skills related to archaeology in the villages of Kegworth and Castle Donington at various DIGS taking place during the month of August 2012.
To take part in these FREE events, meet at Market Place at 10am each morning in Kegworth from Monday 13th to Wednesday 15th August and 10am at Market Place in Castle Donington from Monday 20th to Wednesday 22nd August.

The DIG locations have yet to be confirmed.

Archaeology Researcher Found Dead In Turkey

Archaeology Researcher Found Dead In Turkey

According to Art Jahnke For BU Today, A third-year PhD student working on an archaeological dig in western Turkey was found dead Thursday morning, apparently the victim of a fall in a rugged area of hills and caves in the province of Manisa. Chad DiGregorio, 26, reportedly set out alone on his day off in search of artifacts that would support his research. His body was found by a police search party.

Read more:
http://www.wbur.org/2012/07/20/archaeology-researcher-found-dead-in-turkey

Archaeologists unearth 'cosmopolitan' 1500s settlement near Lake Ontario which was the size of Manhattan

'The ancient New York City of Canada': Archaeologists unearth 'cosmopolitan' 1500s settlement near Lake Ontario which was the size of Manhattan
  • Experts unearth 2,000 artifacts from site near Lake Ontario
  • 'Mantle site' is thought to have had 2,000 inhabitants in 1500s
  • Evidence that locals even acquired European goods a century before European explorers arrived in the region
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2172652/Archaeologists-unearth-cosmopolitan-1500s-settlement-near-Lake-Ontario-size-Manhattan.html#ixzz21cfjxYTT

A 3,400-year-old mystery: Who burned the palace of Canaanite Hatzor?

A 3,400-year-old mystery: Who burned the palace of Canaanite Hatzor?

Archaeologists take on the Bible during Tel Hatzor excavations, when disagreements arise over the destroyer of the city.

Read more: http://www.haaretz.com/news/national/a-3-400-year-old-mystery-who-burned-the-palace-of-canaanite-hatzor.premium-1.453095

Archaeologists plan surveys for stretch of Hudson River near site of 1777 Saratoga battles

Archaeologists plan surveys for stretch of Hudson River near site of 1777 Saratoga battles

Archaeologists will be hitting the water this summer to survey a stretch of the Hudson River near the site of the Battles of Saratoga.

Read more: http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/9d04c7719c804f029eeabcae06d1b41a/NY--Battlefield-Underwater-Archaeology

Arab Mosque’s ancient frescos hidden on the walls

Arab Mosque’s ancient frescos hidden on the walls

Read more here: http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/arab-mosques-ancient-frescos-hidden-on-the-walls.aspx?pageID=238&nID=26243&NewsCatID=375

Wednesday, 11 July 2012

Pakistan police foil huge artefact smuggling attempt

According to the BBC an attempt to smuggle ancient artefacts, possibly worth millions of dollars, out of the Pakistani port city of Karachi has been foiled, police say.

A top archaeologist has said the goods are at least 2,000 years old and were illegally excavated. Police have called in experts to help assess their value.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-18738909

Archaeologists dig up bog army bones in Denmark

(Reuters) - Danish archaeologists said on Tuesday they had re-opened a mass grave of scores of slaughtered Iron Age warriors to find new clues about their fate and the bloody practices of Germanic tribes on the edge of the Roman Empire.

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2012/07/03/us-denmark-bones-sacrifice-idUKBRE86215M20120703

Hoard of gold coins found at Israel Crusades site

(Reuters) - A 1,000-year-old hoard of gold coins has been unearthed at a famous Crusader battleground where Christian and Muslim forces once fought for control of the Holy Land, Israeli archaeologists said on Wednesday.
http://uk.reuters.com/article/2012/07/11/oukoe-uk-israel-archaeology-gold-idUKBRE86A0IA20120711

Monday, 9 July 2012

Mammoth field found at Serbia coal mine 'great find for Ice Age knowledge'

According to the Guardian, Archaeologists say bones of five woolly mammoths at Kostolac coal pit may reveal more about Balkans several millennia ago

Archaeologists have unearthed at least five mammoths at a site in Serbia. The discovery last week at Kostolac coal mine, east of the Serbian capital of Belgrade, is the first of its kind in the region and could offer important insights into how the ice age affected the area now known as the Balkans. Miomir Korac, of Serbia's Archaeology Institute, said: "There are millions of mammoth fragments in the world, but they are rarely so accessible for exploration."

Read more here:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jun/20/mammoth-field-serbia-kostolac-mine?newsfeed=true