Thursday, 25 October 2012

Helen Williams - Archaeology Career Interview

Helen Williams - 2012
We caught up with Helen Williams to ask about her career in Archaeology so far...

Where did you graduate and what are you doing now?
I graduated in 2007 with a 1st Class BSc in Archaeological Science from Reading University. I then stayed on and completed a MSc in Geoarchaeology. I am now going into the final year of my PhD at York University studying the micromorphology of human burials (https://www.york.ac.uk/archaeology/research/research-students/helen-stokes/). 

When you graduated were you looking for a career in archaeology/Phd?
Yes. When I graduated I did want to continue my career in archaeology but took some time out from studying to do some free lance work as an archaeological illustrator and data manager. I had an amazing time doing this and was able to travel to Cyprus and Qatar to take part in both survey work and excavation. I was also able to dig at the Severn Estuary and several UK sites.
  

What has been the greatest success in your career so far?
The biggest success in my career so far has been getting my work published. I was so pleased to get both my undergraduate and MSc dissertations in print! Some of the best experiences however have been my time of site. I love going to unusual and out of the way places. Working at the Severn estuary is always a wonderful excavation to do, the landscape is so different to what I encounter from day to day, with lots of unique challenges and I can never wait to go back!   

Who's your favourite archaeologist?
That is a really tough question to answer. I have met so many extraordinary people in my job that I don't think I could pick a favourite. I've been so lucky to have been based at two really good departments both with experts at the top of their fields. Those that have inspired me the most however are Wendy Matthews and Martin Bell both based at Reading. Working with both of them has helped me develop a strong commitment to the scientific process and dedication to research and the advancement of archaeological science.

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